All the apps you’ll never use

Hammer meets nail courtesy of Charlie Warzel at Buzzfeed.

We’ll wait hours in line in the cold/heat/rain/snow for a shiny new piece of Apple hardware, but once we get it, the first thing we do is fill it with third party services.

I’m sure Apple understands that a majority of their users will never pay for or venture to the app store for an alternative to the default apps. The apps that come with the phone are more than enough for most.

…Monday’s WWDC keynote, there was something noticeable lacking: namely, the notion that any of the new technologies on stage were truly transformative and thereby a convincing reason to buy any deeper into the Apple ecosystem. Instead, WWDC’s highlights felt perfectly competent but hollow: table stakes in a game with a bottomless pot.

Look at it this way. Because Apple’s default apps are so bad, it does open a market for developers (where Apple takes a 30% cut). But, how long can Apple stay in the game with just superior hardware?


Start with why, not what

Cal Newport has a great take on the Apple Watch and its role in your life. He believes that people work backwards. Instead of  what they need, they’re more concerned about what’s hot. Here are two bits of inspiration from his post.

…once you start letting other people tell you how to invest your limited time and attention, you’re almost certainly going to stray from the things you find most important.

Decide what matters to you; seek out the tools that most directly and obviously help you accomplish these things; then get down to work.

Cal Newport

How to quickly erode customer trust

Apple’s customers trust the company with much of their daily lives. Sneaky promotions quickly erode that goodwill. See how things snowball in the eyes of the customer?  An auto-downloaded album leads to them lamenting about small storage limits which leads to poor storage management systems… possible hacks…future distrust.

The right way for Apple to do a big U2 promotional deal like this would have been to simply make the album free on the iTunes Store for a while and promote the hell out of that.

Instead, Apple set everyone’s account to have “purchased” this album, which auto-downloaded it to all of their devices, possibly filling up the stingy base-level storage that Apple still hasn’t raised and exacerbates by iOS’ poor and confusing storage-management facilities. And when people see a random album they didn’t buy suddenly showing up in their “purchases” and library, it makes them wonder where it came from, why it’s there, whether they were charged for it, and whether they were hacked or had their credit card stolen.

via Marco, Anger Over Songs of Innocence