The open source algebra textbook

Sarah Hagan's students at Drumright High School in Drumright, Okla., don't use traditional textbooks — they make their own. They begin with blank composition notebooks and each day, Hagan hands out a lesson she's written herself or open-sourced from other teachers across the country. It's usually printed on colored paper and requires some kind of hands-on work: drawing, coloring, cutting. "The point is, we shouldn't have to be like, 'Oh, yeah, there's that chart on page 763 that tells me how to classify something.' They should think, 'Oh, that's on that blue paper that we did a few days ago, and I doodled in the corner,' " Hagan explains. The link in our profile takes you to the full story. (Credit: @elissanad/NPR) #50GreatTeachers #education #npr #oklahoma

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Shop Class as Soulcraft by Matthew Crawford.

An Inquiry Into the Value of Work

The satisfactions of manifesting oneself concretely in the world through manual competence have been known to make a man quiet and easy. They seem to relieve him of the felt need to offer chattering interpretations of himself to vindicate his worth. He can simply point: the building stands, the car now runs, the lights are on. Boasting is what a boy does, because he has no real effect in the world. But the tradesman must reckon with the infallible judgment of reality, where one’s failures or shortcomings cannot be interpreted away. His well-founded pride is far from the gratuitous “self-esteem” that educators would impart to students, as though by magic.

via Matthew B. CrawfordShop Class as Soulcraft: An Inquiry Into the Value of Work

Your mind spinning like fan blades at high speed

Dear you,
you who always have
so many things to do
so many places to be
your mind spinning like
fan blades at high speed
each moment always a blur
because you’re never still

I know you’re tired
I also know it’s not your fault
The constant brain-buzz is like
a swarm of bees threatening
to sting if you close your eyes
You’ve forgotten something again
You need to prepare for that or else
You should have done that differently

What if you closed your eyes?
Would the world fall
apart without you?
Or would your mind
become the open sky
flock of thoughts
flying across the sunrise
as you just watched and smiled

Kaveri Patel, “The Voice”